Haying

While the farm crew typically works five days each week in the summer, no one takes a day off when it’s time to make hay. Faculty and even neighbors are likely to join the effort of bringing in the five or six hundred square bales that we might put up in a typical afternoon. After the hay is tedded, dried, and baled, everyone loads the bales onto our wooden wagons and then unloads them into our barns. We bale hay when it’s hot, so the hay will stay dry and nutritious for the cows and sheep to eat through the winter. This summer the farm crew will bring in around 4,000 bales of first-cut hay, and fall semester students will help bring in about 1,000 bales of second-cut hay.

Haying